Autistic Participants

Autism and Advanced Manufacturing Free Pilot Program for Participants

Have you ever considered a career in advanced manufacturing? We’d like to find out more about if you’ve ever explored a career in advanced manufacturing, if you haven’t then why and how we can help make that happen if you’re interested. Why? Because we believe the autism community should have more options that just IT or game development!

Does any of this sound like you?

  • Are you good with details?
  • Do you like working with your hands?
  • Do you like solving problems?
  • Are you ok with basic math – addition, subtraction, etc. ?
  • Do you enjoy working relatively independently?
  • Do you like having responsibility and being accountable for your work?
  • Do you prefer being on your feet, doing stuff, rather than sitting at a desk?

 

  • Do you like creating, making, and building things?
  • Do you like working with your hands?
  • Do your friends call you when they need help in fixing mechanical things?
  • Are good with details and precision?
  • Do you like tinkering with mechanical things?
  • Do you like physical activity at work?
  • Do you prefer being busy all the time rather than having periods of inactivity?

What’s involved in finding out if a role in advanced manufacturing is right for you?

An open mind and some time!

This free program happens over 8 months and involves the following:

Interview and Discovery Tools

We want to make sure that every participant has the best opportunity to succeed within the program. Our autism employment specialists will connect with you to do a quick phone interview and send you links to two discovery tools called the Enneagram and Career Peronality Profiler.

WBLC Aptitude Testing

We’re trying to create a talent pool with a particular set of interests and abilities. After taking part in the discovery tools, the Work Based Learning Consortium will administer a very quick aptitude test.

Information Sessions

This is where we get to some learning about what advanced manufacturing is, the types of roles available and the roles we’ll specifically be focusing on. The sessions are online for now though we might be able to offer some face to face opportunities soon!

Roundtables and Debrief Sessions

Your opinion and experience is the most important thing about this project. Why? Just because we think the autism community is a good fit for roles in advanced manufacturing doesn’t mean we’re right! It’s up to you to tell us what you think so we can help you and hopefully hundreds more autistic Canadians end up in good jobs.

Networking Event

Your opinion and experience is the most important thing about this project. Why? Just because we think the autism community is a good fit for roles in advanced manufacturing doesn’t mean we’re right! It’s up to you to tell us what you think so we can help you and hopefully hundreds more autistic Canadians end up in good jobs.

Interested in learning more? Join us for a 1 hour free information session with time built in for Q&A. We’ll share what’s involved in the program and have experts on hand to answer your questions!

CHOOSE ONE OF THE FREE SESSIONS LISTED BELOW ON A DATE AND TIME THAT WORKS FOR YOU.

CLICK THE BUTTON TO REGISTER ON EVENTBRITE.

1: Autism and Advanced Manufacturing Program for Participants

 

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Here’s a quick program overview:

Job Overviews

CNC Machinist (Level 1)

What Does A CNC Machinist Do? 

Machining is a big part of manufacturing processes. A CNC machinist is specially trained to program, operate, and maintain CNC Machines. He or she uses expert knowledge to set up machines that are capable of cutting, bending, forming, and polishing raw metal into finished parts and tools. Metal parts used to be cut and molded by hand. Today, a CNC machinist reads and interprets blueprints, programs and inputs data into a computer system, monitors production, makes careful adjustments, and inspects the accuracy of a machine’s operation and resulting parts.

Mold Maintenance Technician (Level 1)

What Does A Mold Maintenance Technician [Level 1] Do?

Molding machines and molds must operate properly and repeatedly over many hours and days to ensure that the parts produced meet quality standards and production rates.  A Mold Maintenance Technician [Level 1] is responsible for cleaning, assembling and disassembling new and/or refurbished molds so they function properly; s/he will also, as directed, evaluate molds to determine root cause of molding issues, and will check mold functionality for air, water and hydraulic effectiveness.

CNC Operator

What Does A CNC Operator Do?

CNC Operators play a key role in many Ontario advanced manufacturing businesses, responsible for ensuring that cutting, drilling, shaping and finishing metal products and components on CNC machines/workcells is done correctly and efficiently. Typically, the job involves properly loading the correct materials/workpieces into a CNC machine/workcell, monitoring the CNC machine/workcell operations, unloading the finished workpieces from the CNC machine/workcell and performing measurement/inspection procedures to ensure that finished items meet quality and technical standards.

Funding provided by the Government of Canada through the Canada Job Grant
Programs delivered by the Government of Ontario is in partnership with the Work Based Learning Consortium.

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